GMO Foods

I know this subject has been discussed many times, but I bumped into this article today, and discovered that some of the foods I regularly buy could also be GMO.

So, just to recap, here’s the products that are most likely to be GMO:

  • Soybeans – Gene taken from bacteria (Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4) and inserted into soybeans to make them more resistant to herbicides.[1] See How to Live With a Soy Allergy for more information on avoiding soy products
  • Corn – There are two main varieties of GE corn. One has a Gene from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis inserted to produce the Bt toxin, which poisons Lepidoteran (moths and butterflies) pests.[2] There are also several events which are resistant to various herbicide. Present in high fructose corn syrup and glucose/fructose which is prevalent in a wide variety of foods in America.
  • Rapeseed/Canola – Gene added/transferred to make crop more resistant to herbicide.
  • Sugar beets – Gene added/transferred to make crop more resistant to Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide.
  • Cotton – engineered to produce Bt toxin. The seeds are pressed into cottonseed oil, which is a common ingredient in vegetable oil and margarine.
  • Dairy – Cows injected with GE hormone rBGH/rBST; possibly fed GM grains and hay.
  • Sugar. In 2012 the FDA approved GMO Beet Sugars to be allowed to be sold on the market under the name…. “SUGAR” So now, when we go to buy “All Natural” Breyer’s Ice Cream, we can’t even know for sure that we are actually eating regular natural cane sugar. If you see “CANE SUGAR” there’s a good chance it’s not GMO. This is one of the biggest frustrations with labelling, as sugar is in so many things, and we might be avoiding food that POSSIBLY has GMO sugar, but really does not.
  • Papayas.
  • Zuchini.
  • Corn sold directly to the consumer at Roadside stands / markets. Buy organic corn, popcorn, corn chips only.
  • Baked goods: Often has one or more of the common GM ingredients in them. Why do we need corn or soy in our bread, snacks or desserts? It’s hard to find mixes to use as well. Some brands avoid GMs, find one you like and try to stick with it. Organic is one option, learning how to cook brownies, etc, from scratch with your own organic oils is another.

I didn’t know about zucchinis and papayas, came as a sad surprise. But while those and other fruits/veggies can at least be identified by looking at the label, baked/canned goods are a more complicated case scenario, unless those are clearly called ‘organic’. So more reasons to stick with organic stores and avoid sugar and baked goods.

 

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